Basing your miniatures can be hard work. Sometimes after painting up a beautiful model, I find myself wanting to skip doing the bases or not really wanting to put any effort into it. After painting almost my whole life, I know now that skipping the bases is a major mistake. Instead, I have tried to find quick ways of doing cool looking bases.

One of the tricks you can use to do fast but good looking bases is by using the GW texture paints, and in this article, I will show you exactly how each will look when used.

I will review the 11 different Citadel Texture paints sold by Games Workshop. I will provide you with a detailed view of how each texture will look like on the base when dried. You will see two versions pr. paint, one where the texture is used sparingly and one where I have used it liberally.

What are Games Workshop Citadel Texture Paints?


Games Workshops Citadel texture paints are a special brand of paint that is very unlike the normal acrylic paint they sell. The paints have a thick almost dry consistency. Most of them include some grit in the paint, and all of them will provide texture when dried.

The texture will provide a quick base for miniature models and is a substitute for the normal process of using flock, cork or other basing materials. The paints are mainly used for basing your miniatures but can also be used on a model (if you know what you are doing). Games Workshop currently sells 11 different texture paints. Most will just provide a nice texture and colour to the base, while others will make a cool crackle or snow effect.

You can find all of the texture paints here.

Disclaimer: a note about affiliate links, sponsorship and prices


Games Workshop did not provide me with any review copies and this is not a sponsored review in any way. Throughout this article, I use the official GW prizing.

I use affiliate links that will direct you to places where you can buy the stuff way cheaper than at GW. If you click on a link and buy anything, I will get a small kickback from the store (affiliate link). That money will go into supporting the site and writing more articles to help people with their wargaming hobby. If you enjoy the article, you can show your appricetion by using a link before you buy a new models or hobby tools.

A note on the pictures used

For each different texture paint, I have tried to provide pictures that accurately display what it is you are getting from the paint. I have done no highlighting or any tricks that will make it look better. I have tried to take pictures that as accurately as possible will portray the colour and texture you will get. I use the following pictures for each texture paint:

 

1. A picture of the paint just after it has been applied but before it has dried.

2. A picture of the paint after it has dried completely. In all examples, I make two versions using the same texture paint. On the first version, I apply a lot of texture to make a thick version. On the second version, I apply as little texture as possible, while still covering the base in its entirety to make a thin version.

3. A top-down version and an angled picture of each paint. You might notice a small difference in colour between the top-down version and the angled version. The shots of the top-down versions are taken in an indoor setting with an artificial light source. This is probably how it will look on most tabletops. The angled version is taken indoor but close to a big window with a natural light source. If you play in a well light area, this is what it will look like to you.

4. The picture used by Games Workshop to display the paint side by side with a version I made.  I use this to comment on how their picture is different from what the paint will look in the real world straight out of the pot. All credit on these pictures goes to Games Workshop.

An image of Stirland Mud texture paint made by Games Workshop

The 3 classic grit based rough-textured paints


In the following section, I will take a look at three paints that are very similar in texture type but different in colour. These three represent a very classic rough texture with grit in it.

The three classic grit based texture paints are:

  1. Astrogranite Debris
  2. Armageddon Dunes
  3. Stirland Battlemire

All of these paints produce a similar texture effect and only the colour is different.

First, you will get a lot of pictures of each paint. After that, I will write about how the paints are to apply, how I think the result was, their durability, how the results differ from the GW image and my overall verdict on the texture paints.

1. Astrogranite Debris

An image of Astrogranite Debris texture paint made by Games Workshop

2. Armageddon Dunes

An image of Armageddon Dunes texture paint made by Games Workshop

3. Stirland Battlemire

An image of Stirland Battlemire texture paint made by Games Workshop

Astrogranite Debris before drying

Astrogranite Debris Texture paint before it dries

This is a picture of the texture just after it has been applied to a base that has been primed grey.

Astrogranite Debris when dry

Astrogranite Debris texture paints after it has dried

Thick coat of Astrogranite Debris

A picture of Astrogranite Debris texture paint thick version top down version
A picture of Astrogranite Debris texture paint thick version angled version

Thin coat of Astrogranite Debris

A picture of Astrogranite Debris texture paint thin version angled version
A picture of Astrogranite Debris texture paint thin version top down version

Armageddon Dunes before drying

A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes while still wet

This is a picture of the texture just after it has been applied to a base that has been primed black.

Armageddon Dunes when dry

A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes when dry

Thick coat of Armageddon Dunes

A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes thick top down version
A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes thick angled version

Thin coat of Armageddon Dunes

A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes thin top down version
A picture of the texture paint Armageddon Dunes thin angled version

Stirland Battlemire before drying

Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire when wet

This is a picture of the texture just after it has been applied to a base that has been primed black.

Stirland Battlemire when dry

Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire when dry

Thick coat of Stirland Battlemire

Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire in a thick version seen top down
Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Stirland Battlemire

Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire in a thin version seen top down
Image containing the GW texture paint Stirland Battlemire in a thin version seen angled

Astrogranite Debris: Real vs GW picture

Image of Astrogranite Debris to compare it with the GW version
Image of GWs version of Astrogranite

Armageddon Dunes:  Real vs GW picture

Image of Armageddon Dunesto compare it with the GW version
Image of GWs version of Armageddon Dunes

Stirland Battlemire:  Real vs GW picture

Image of Stirland Battlemire to compare it with the GW version
Image of GWs version of Stirland Battlemire

Overview Astrogranite Debris, Armegaddon Dunes and Stirland Mud

The three paints all come in a 24ml version for 4.75£ from Games Workshop. It is possible to find them in a smaller version, but if you intend to use it for basing your whole army, you should probably go with the big version. I have based around 750 of assorted big (40mm and up) miniatures with one pot, so the price is not that high.

The three colours are grey, light sand brown and a very dark brown. Each of them shares the same colour as the other texture paints that share their name. So Astrogranite Debris is the same colour as Astrogranite, Armeggadon Dunes is paired with Armageddon dust and Stirland Battlemire is the same colour as Stirland Mud (more on those other paints in the next section). This means it would be easy to do a base where you mixe those two textures together because the colour will blend (it also means that I constantly pick up the wrong paint by mistake).

All of the paints are somewhat dry paints with grit in them. The texture will dry on your base and will provide a hard texture.

How are the grit texture paints compared to the pictures GW represents them with?

It is clear from all of the GW pictures that their version has been heavily drybrushed. A beginning painter might not know this, making their representation quite far from how the base actually looks. Especially the Stirland Battlemire is quite far from how the texture looks without any paint on it.

GW has put up a PDF describing how to achieve the same effect. That said, it is hard to see how a wash and a drybrush will achieve exactly the results they have on their pictures. For me, it looks like they have done a bit more than what they describe. Also, it is hard to know how much texture GW has applied to their bases (the top down view is not the best for that). It looks like they have done a mix of a thick coat and a light coat.

Application of the three classic grit textures

The texture is gritty and quite thick. It would be easy to ruin a brush if you tried to apply the texture with it, so go with something else. You can basically use any hard long plastic thingy, but if you are are a fanboy like me you can get a plastic stick with the GW brand on it

I found it quite easy to scoop the material out of the pots and onto the bases. When first I had it on the base it was manageable to move it around – but also a  bit tricky at times. If you are looking to do an even surface that can be somewhat tricky, but I think the point of the texture is to add depth so an even finish is not something you should be aiming at anyway.

All in all, I find the three grit textures to be easy to apply. I can highly recommend these for beginners, where PVA glue and flock can be a bit of a hassle. I big bonus of the texture is the “neatness” of doing a base this way. I find many other basing materials to be quite messy, but this feels just like painting the base and not like basing.

Results and durability

After about 5 hours the material was dry enough to handle, but I would recommend you just leave the texture overnight to make sure it dries completely before handling.

All of the paints slightly change colour in the drying process but it is not really an issue. Be mindful that the material can shrink a bit in the drying process as well.

I think the thick versions look way better than the thin version. The thin version lacks character and will look like basic flock from a distance. If you do the thin version you would have to use other materials in combination to make the base look good.

The thick version lends itself very much to being washed and/or dry brushed. Minimal painting effort on top of the material will make it look great (and help differentiate it from others who have used the same material). The colour is also quite bland and flat on all of the paints, so drybrushing is definitely recommended. I doubt a wash/shade would work very good on the thin version (not a lot of cracks to fall into), but could definitely be used with the thick version.

The durability of the texture is quite amazing. I experienced no material coming off while drybrushing or painting it, and I went quite rough with a big brush. All of my test bases went through the process of being in a plastic bag together while I moved house. The crackle texture paints took a bit of damage, but I can see no marks or flake from these grit ones. I have some bases I did when these paints first came out years ago, and they are still going strong. Top durability!

My verdict on the three classic grit textures

I am a huge fan of the classic grit texture paints and can only recommend them. You will find them easy to use and no technical difficulties with the material rubbing off or any other weird mishaps. These, together with some great shades, are truly a beginning basers best friend.

In many ways, these paints are a shortcut to a great looking base and the grit texture massively helps ‘cheat out' a great base with minimal effort.

Pros:

  • Coverage is good
  • Easy to apply
  • Easy to shade and dry brush
  • Can be painted or drybrushed to a completely different colour
  • Non-messy and quick basing solution
  • Durability is top notch

Cons:

  • The texture is a very common solution so it is unlikely to ‘wow' anybody. You are going to see a lot of armies based with these textures, so if you want something unique you have to add more stuff to the bases
  • The thin version is a bit bland and the thick solution can become expensive in the long run
  • The grit in the paints is made of plastic microbeads which is very bad for the environment if you flush excess material in the drain (do not do that!)

Tips for using the grit textures

  • Be mindful of getting a primer on the base before you apply it, or else you might experience the material rubbing off
  • I recommend glueing the model onto the base after you have applied the texture and painted it. If not, you will probably get something on the feet of the miniature (but if you do it by purpose it can look cool)
  • Mix the thin and thick version to make a more diverse base
  • Mix the classic grit versions with crackle effect paint or other basing materials to make a more unique base
  •  Remember to paint the rim of your base after you are done with your base. If not, your miniature and base can look unfinished. Light brown colours can work well with almost any other colours on the base
GWs picture of Stirland Mud texture paint

The 3 smaller grained gritty texture paints


In the following section, I will take a look at three slightly different texture paints:

  1. Atrogranite
  2. Armageddon Dust
  3. Stirland Mud

The three paints share their colour with the three textures covered in the last section.

So:

  • Astrogranite equals Astrogranite Debris
  • Armageddon Dust is paired with Armeggadon Dunes
  • Stirland Mud is paired with Stirland Battlemire.

First, you will get a lot of pictures of each paint. After that, I will write about how the paints are to apply, how I think the result was, their durability, how the results differ from the GW image and my overall verdict on the paints.

1. Astrogranite

2. Armageddon Dust

3. Stirland Mud

Image of Astrogranite
Image of Stirland Battlemire
Image of Armageddon Dunes

Astrogranite before drying

Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed grey.

Astrogranite when dry

Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Astrogranite

Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Astrogranite

Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Astrogranite Citadel texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Armageddon Dust before drying

Image of Armageddon Dust Citadel texture paint when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed black.

Armageddon Dust when dry

Image of Armageddon Dust Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Armageddon Dust

Image of Armageddon Dust texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Armageddon Dust texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Armageddon Dust

Image of Armageddon Dust texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Armageddon Dust texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Stirland Mud before drying

Image of Stirland Mud Citadel texture paint when still wet
This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed black.

Stirland Mud when dry

Image of Stirland Mud Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Stirland Mud

Image of Stirland Mud texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Stirland Mud texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Stirland Mud

Image of Stirland Mud texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Stirland Mud texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Astrogranite: Real vs GW picture

Armageddon Dust:  Real vs GW picture

Stirland Mud:  Real vs GW picture

Image showing Astrogranite
Image showing Astrogranite GW version
Image showing Armageddon Dust
Image showing Armageddon Dust GW version
Image showing Stirland Mud
Image showing Stirland Mud GW version

Astrogranite vs Astrogranite Debris

Armageddon Dust vs Armageddon Dunes

Stirland Mud vs Stirland Battlemire

Astrogranite Thick version
Astrogranite Debris Thick version
Armageddon Dust thick version
Armageddon Dunes thick version
Stirland Mud thick version
Stirland Battlemire thick version

Overview of Astrogranite, Armageddon Dust and Stirland Mud

The three paints all come in a 24ml version for 4.75£ from Games Workshop.

Right of the bat, it is clear to see what the difference there is between these versions and the earlier grit versions, at least if you see them side by side as above. The Astrogranite and the Mud versions both come out more flat looking whereas their counterpart has a more rough finish.

The one exception is the Armageddon dust, that looks very much like the Dunes version. I actually think this is because there is something wrong with my Armageddon dust – my paint pot was simply broken some way. From the GW pictures, it looks like it should end up with the flatter surface, but mine just did not. There are also some weird white specs that look like sand corn in my version, making it more likely that my pot is a failed version.

How are the texture paints compared to the pictures GW represents them with?

GW has used very little texture on their versions, so those are the images versions I have put side by side with them. The Astrogranite and the Armageddon Dust should be quite easy to make. Just apply very little texture and use the technique GW describes in their pdf.

Their Stirland Mud version is quite weird because they have painted it so much that it does not really look like the original colour but to each their own I guess.

Application of the three classic grit textures

The texture is quite thick straight from the pot, so do not use a brush to apply it.

I found the Dust version to be way too dense to get on, and it was very hard to get an even coat. This gives more credence to me thinking that my pot might have a crack in it, and the paint has gotten too much air.

Getting an even coat from the Astrogranite and Mud was quite easy, so you should have no problem there.

Results and durability

I found that these textures took a bit more time to dry than the others do. The colour remained the same for all of them in the drying process, but all of the paints shrunk a bit after it was dry.

The difference between the thick and the thin version is quite big and looks almost nothing alike. This is a good thing because if you use both techniques on one base it will look quite good.

The thin version could be very good to drybrush, but the thick would be a bit hard to get a good effect on. You would be able to paint a completely different colour on booth the thick and thin versions.

As with the other gritty textures, the durability is really good. You will basically not experience anything coming off – not when painting on it or when playing with your miniatures. Top notch durability again.

 

My view of the three smaller grit texture paints

While not that different from the classic texture paints, they do open a few new possibilities. I am not a big fan of how the thick versions came out, and the Dust version was just bad in my experience.

Pros:

  • In combination with the other texture of the same colour, you could get quite a lot of variety on a base (but still with a limited amount of time used)
  • The coverage is very good, and you can do good looking bases with not a lot of texture used
  • Very easy to apply
  • Easy to drybrush
  • You can get a different colour if you apply enough paint afterwards
  • Durability is very good

Cons:

  • Air can ruin your paint pot before you get to use the texture
  • Not that different from the classic texture paints
  • It can be hard to discern the texture from a distance (looks cool in hand but bland on the tabletop)
  • The grit in the paints is made of plastic microbeads which is very bad for the environment if you flush excess material in the drain

Tips for using the grit textures

  • Be mindful of getting a primer on the base before you apply it, or else you might experience the material rubbing off
  • I recommend glueing the model onto the base after you have applied the texture and painted it. If not, you will probably get something on the feet of the miniature (but if you do it by purpose it can look cool)
  • Mix the thin and thick version to make a more diverse base
  • Painting the rim after you are all done will make the texture ‘pop' a bit more
GW picture of Martian Ironcrust

The 4 crackle texture paints


In the following section, I will take a look at four crackle type texture paints:

  1. Agrellan Earth
  2. Agrellan Badland
  3. Martian Ironearth
  4. Martian Ironcrust

The two Agrellan pots share the same colour and the two Martian pots share the same colour. The Agrellan Earth and the Martian Ironearth have the same crackle effect, and the Badland and Ironcrust share the same texture properties.

First, you will get a lot of pictures of each paint. After that, I will write about how the paints are to apply, how I think the result was, their durability, how the results differs from the GW image and my overall verdict on the crackle texture paints.

1. Agrellan Earth

Image showing the texture paint Agrellan Earth

3. Martian Ironearth

Image showing the texture paint Martian Ironearth

2. Agrellan Badland

Image showing the texture paint Agrellan Badland

4. Martian Ironcrust

Image showing the texture paint Martian Ironcrust

Agrellan Earth before drying

Image of Agrellan earth Citadel texture paint when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed grey and painted black on top afterwards.

Agrellan Earth when dry

Image of Agrellan earth Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Agrellan Earth

Image of Agrellan Earth texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Agrellan Earth texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Agrellan Earth

Image of Agrellan Earth texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Agrellan Earth texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Agrellan Badland before drying

Image of Agrellan Badland Citadel texture paint when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed and painted black on top afterwards.

Agrellan Badland when dry

Image of Agrellan Badland Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Agrellan Badland

Image of Agrellan Badland texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Agrellan Badland texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Agrellan Badland

Image of Agrellan Badland texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Agrellan Badland texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Martian Ironearth before drying

Image of Martian Ironearth Citadel texture paint when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed white and painted black on top afterwards.

Martian Ironearth when dry

Image of Martian Ironearth Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Martian Ironearth

Image of Martian Ironearth texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Martian Ironearth texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Martian Ironearth

Image of Martian Ironearth texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Martian Ironearth texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Martian Ironcrust before drying

Image of Martian Ironcrust Citadel texture paint when still wet
This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed white and painted black afterwards.

Martian Ironcrust when dry

Image of Martian Ironcrust Citadel texture paint when dry

Thick coat of Martian Ironcrust

Image of Martian Ironcrust texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Martian Ironcrust texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Martian Ironcrust

Image of Martian Ironcrust texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Martian Ironcrust texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Agrellan Earth: Real vs GW picture

Agrellan Earth base
Agrellan Earth base GW version

Martian Ironearth:  Real vs GW picture

Base done with Martian Ironearth
Base done with Martian Ironearth by GW

Agrellan Badland:  Real vs GW picture

Agrellan Badland based
Agrellan Badland base GW version

Martian Ironcrust:  Real vs GW picture

Base done with Martian Ironcrust
Base done with Martian Ironcrust by GW

Overview Agrellan Earth, Agrellan Badland and Martian Ironearth and Martian Ironcrust

The four paints all come in a 24ml version for 4.75£ from Games Workshop. It is possible to find them in a smaller version, but these are slowly getting phased out.

The two different colours are light brown and a very striking red/orange. I find that there is a small difference in the nuance between Agrellan Earth and the Agrelland Badland, as well as between the two versions of the Martian colour. This could be due to the consistency of texture applied to the base, a difference in how old the pots were and so on. I have seen several people use a mixture of earth and badland to base their minis, and I did not notice any difference in colour there. At any rate, if you drybrush it just a tiny bit any difference will be very hard to spot.

The texture of the paint in the pot is very smooth, almost looking like slightly dry paint. Even after the paint has dried a bit in one of my pots, it did not ruin it and it still cracked as it should.

How are the crackle paints compared to the pictures GW represents them with?

The GW version of booth agrellan versions is not that far from each other, if you look past that I got a bit too much texture on my badland version. Booth cracked in the way advertised and a bit of drybrushing will go a long way of making them look like the GW version. It will take a bit of practice to do the GW version of Agrellan Earth, seeing as it is very hard to get the paint to make such small cracks.

It is striking how little texture GW have used on their Martian Ironearth version. I tried to replicate it with the thin version I did of it, but I used way too much. If you want to do that style of basing, one pot will go a long way.

It was quite hard to get the right amount of texture on the Martian Ironcrust base. Too much and it cracks in a weird way, too little and it does not crack. But, a bit of shading and a little drybrush might fix it.

Application of the four crackle paints

It was easy to get the texture out of the pot and onto the base, but it was actually a bit hard to move the stuff around the base in the way I wanted to do. Doing the thick version will take a bit of practice, because of how wet the paint is. Using a brush on the two earth version is not out of the question, as there is no grit in the paint – as long as you remember to clean that sucker thoroughly afterwards (in fact you should always clean your brushes. If you want to read more about how to do that, I have written a good guide on it here).

The Badland and Ironcrust has a bit more texture in the paint and was not as smooth to work with. You will need some sort of tool to move it around.

The four crackle paints are even more beginner friendly than the other more gritty paints. The process is surprisingly like ‘painting the base' and so does not differ from the other techniques you need to learn as a beginner.

Results and durability

The crackle paint dries somewhat quickly, but I would let it sit overnight. It has a tendency to flake off otherwise. I did not find any colour change in the drying process.

The two earth versions gave a very nice crackle effect, and I am a big fan. It is quite unique compared to the grit versions and what you can do with basic flock.

The Badland and Ironcrust give a bit of a combo between a crackle effect and a textured effect. While the effect is not as obvious, and will not ‘pop' in the same way on the table, it looks quite good.

Do note that you need to apply Badland and Ironcrust liberally in order for there to be any good crackle effect. In fact, this also goes for the two earth versions. I have seen a couple of beginners thinking their pots were broken because they never got any crack effect, all because they only painted a very thin coat on the base.

If you look closely at my agrelland earth version above, you can see some tiny bits of white. The bases I used were primed white for another project, so I just did a good black coat on the top of them before applying the Agrellan Earth. What happens is that the crackle paint will lift whatever paint there is below it. In this case, it lifted the black paint a bit, and now you can see the white primer underneath. Not good! The texture will have a hard time lifting a primer, so use that for the colour you want to show through the below (unless you want to look like a noob as I did).

Both versions can be drybrushed, but with booth earth version you will notice some of the texture coming off. I do not find this a huge problem, because I just glue my tufts, skulls and other bits on the newly opened spots, but you need to be aware of this before drybrushing them.

The durability on the two earth versions as not that good, but I found no flaking on the Badland/Ironcrust.

My view of the four crackle paints

The crackle paint is one of my go-to when I need a quick base for a miniature. This means I have also done all of my Orruk units with a combination of Agrellan Earth and various extra bits on top. I think the two earth crackle paint would be my best suggestion if you want to do the simplest base possible (just put the texture on, drybrush and stop there).

In fact, I like the crackle paints so much, that I recommend using one of these paints when you paint up your first army (if you want to read a guide on painting your first army, take a look at my article here)

Pros:

  • Booth earth versions are very beginner friendly
  • The Badland/Ironcrust could be painted to be a different colour
  • You can mix the two versions to make something more special
  • Non-messy and quick basing solution
  • Both thin and thick versions look good

Cons:

  • The two earth versions are used by many painters as a basing method. This means it is not that unique and everyone will know ‘the trick'
  • You will need quite a lot of texture to do a whole army
  • You can botch the earth versions by not applying enough texture
  • Doing a whole army you want the bases to be uniform in the basing method. Sometimes it can be hard to nail the same effect over and over again
  • You will have some of the texture rubbing of when drybrushing and playing with the two earth versions
  • It will be hard to paint the two earth versions to become another colour completely

Tips for using the crackle textures

  • A primer underneath the two earth versions is a must. If not, the paints fall right off!
  • Glueing the miniature on top of the two earth versions can be a bit of a problem. I find that they sometimes fall off. If possible, glue the minis on first before you apply Agrellan Earth and Martian Ironearth
  • Mix the thin and thick version to make a more diverse base
  • Mix the classic grit versions with crackle effect paint or other basing materials to make a more unique base
  • The crackle paints can be used to make cool effects on models as well

Valhallan Blizzard: snow effect


 

Valhallan Blizzard done by gw

The Valhallan Blizzard is a very unique snow effect texture paint. It replaces the earlier snow pigment GW made and is my opinion very good compared to what GW made earlier.

Valhallan Blizzard before drying

Valhallan Blizzard when still wet

This is a picture of the texture applied to a base that has been primed grey and painted with blue afterwards.

Valhallan Blizzard when dry

Valhallan Blizzard when dried

Thick coat of Valhallan Blizzard

Image of Valhallan Blizzard texture paint when in a thick version seen top down
Image of Valhallan Blizzard texture paint when in a thick version seen angled

Thin coat of Valhallan Blizzard

Image of Valhallan Blizzard texture paint when in a thin version seen top down
Image of Valhallan Blizzard texture paint when in a thin version seen angled

Valhallan Snow: Real vs GW picture

 Valhallan Blizzard
 Valhallan Blizzard done by GW

Overview Valhallan Blizzard

The Valhallan Blizard comes in a 24ml version for 4.75£ from Games Workshop.

Instead of the other texture paints, this work quite diferently. With my versions I have tried to use the paint like the others, and covered the base with it. While it can look okay, you will get a much more striking look if you mix it on top of a base with something else on it.

How is the Valhallan Blizzard compared to the picture GW uses?

The GW version looks pretty good, but they also have a lot going on. In their version, they have some sort of texture underneath, and a dry brush has been applied. After that, some tufts has been glued on and in the end, they have applied the Valhallan Blizzard on top quite liberally. The effect looks good, but it will take you some time and effort to achieve.

Application of Valhallan Blizzard

 

The texture in the pot is actually a bit like snow, only dry and not cold. It comes out easily, but it can be a bit difficult to get it to fall how you want it to. After drying, it sticks on to the base. I did not notice any shrinking when drying.

You cannot use a brush to scoop it around, but any hard tool will do nicely. The application will be very easy, but remember that less is more with a snow effect.

Results and durability

The snow effect sticks on surprisingly quickly and was very easy to apply and just behaves like you would think it should behave. This is somewhat of a surprise since every other ‘snow effect' texture or powder I have used has been a big hassle. A major thumbs up from me!

After a while, the snow texture starts to rub off, and over time this can become a problem. Luckily, if it does become an issue I think it would be easy to apply a bit more snow where stuff has fallen off.

All in all the snow effect looks much more real than alternatives I have tried and seen. A good job on GW's part!

My view on Valhallan Blizzard

The snow effect is a classic go-to inspiration for a lot of new players. This also means that badly done snow bases are a very common sight. Luckily, I think Valhallan Blizzard can go a long way to remedy that. The application is dead easy and the result is far more striking than much of the competition.

 

Pros:

  • Easy solution to make a base done with other textures ‘pop'
  • Very easy to apply
  • Not that messy compared to other options (baking soda and powders)
  • Thick and thin versions can look good

Cons:

  • If overdone, it can look bad
  • Snow bases are quite common, so you have to work to make it unique
  • If you think the snow is not white enough, it will be difficult to change the colour
  • Since it takes some practice to apply the way you want it, you might experience that the last base of your army looks much better than the first one you did

Tips for using the snow effect

  • Do not use only the snow effect on the base. You need other textures and bits to make it look good.
  • Less is more
  • You can use a bit of snow on the miniatures as well, to make it look more real
Picture of all the Citadel texture paint produced by Games Workshop for Age of Sigmar and Warhammer 40k

Overall verdict on the texture paints

Pros

  • All of the texture paints are beginner friendly and very hard to mess up
  • Compared to all other methods I have used and seen for basing, this is by far the least messy one. If you struggle to do bases because of all the hassle, this might be the stuff for you.
  • I found the price to be perfectly acceptable. If I am going to paint expensive miniatures, I find it okay to spend a bit of money on the bases.

Cons

  • The naming scheme is a bit weird and could use some work. I sometimes struggle to remember if the difference between Astrogranite Debris and Astrogranite. This can be a problem because I cannot look at the two pots and she a difference in the texture.
  • If you are going to base the whole of your army, it can become a bit expensive in the long run. I have found that a pot can almost do 1000 points of big miniatures and around 750 of smaller minis – but it really depends on the bases, how thick you apply it and so on.

 

Related questions


I have found a pot of Blackfire Earth, Lustrian Undergrowth and Mourn Mountain Snow. Why are they not included here?

For some reason, GW decided to discontinue all of those pots. The snow one was really bad, but the other two was okay. If you are just going to do a couple of bases they can be fine, but if you plan to base an army the same way you should keep away from the out of production paints.

You mention other basing materials that I could use. What should I look for?

There is a host of different materials out there. This is what GW produces:

But you could also really dive into all of the different manufacturers and see what they have. Beware, it might take hours before you are doing looking at bits.

Are there any videos on how to apply the texture paints?

Yeah, there totally is. GW do a very good job of producing various painting videos on their youtube channel, so take a look there.

Thanks for reading!


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